Trial aims to improve Exmouth water quality

Shannon BeattiePilbara News
Reset Global international business director Paul McIntosh and founder/inventor Paul Leitch with Shire of Exmouth chief executive Cameron Woods (centre).
Camera IconReset Global international business director Paul McIntosh and founder/inventor Paul Leitch with Shire of Exmouth chief executive Cameron Woods (centre). Credit: Pilbara News, Shannon Beattie

Moves are afoot to improve the water quality in Exmouth that could lead to residents being able to use their own taps without the need for filters and softeners.

The Shire of Exmouth has engaged WA-based company Reset Global to run a trail aimed at reducing water hardness by lowering the level of dissolved solids, such as calcium and magnesium in the water.

The process used is environmentally friendly, 100 per cent chemical-free and works as a sort of organic filtration system.

Reset Global inventor Paul Letich said the plan was to run a blend of minerals through a bore-water pump to improve the quality of water coming out of the ground so it could be used for reticulation.

“Between the bore and the actual town drinking water, there is not a lot of difference,” he said.

“If we can do what we think we’re going to, the bore water will be perfect for reticulation but with one or two further steps we will be able to fix the town water in Exmouth.”

Shire of Exmouth chief executive Cameron Woods said while Exmouth’s water supply met all health-related requirements, the trial aimed to improve the palatability of the water and reduce reliance on bottled water and filters.

“This would have significant benefits for residents and potentially negate the need for household water softeners to prolong the life of water-using appliances such as solar hot water systems and dishwashers,” he said.

Reset Global’s technology targets unwanted elements in the water column and removes them through absorption and adsorption.

“This is a very simple solution to put in place which will give you clean water and could be applied across the Pilbara, or really, anywhere in the country with water-quality issues,” Mr Letich said.

The solution costs about 50 per cent less than a Water Corporation reverse osmosis plant and Mr Woods said the Shire had been in close contact with Reset Global about the trial.

“We will be carrying out testing that meets required protocols so results can be shared and used to assess the suitability of the system for town supplies,” he said.

If Reset Global receives the required backing, it could have the system set up in Exmouth within three months.

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