Funding to continue for Roebourne arts group

Alicia PereraPilbara News
Young Roebourne Big hART participants Alison Lockyer, 16, Max Coppin, 16, and Nelson Coppin, 17, with WMYAC directors Allery Sandy and Michelle Adams announce extended funding for Big hART onstage at an event in Hobart.
Camera IconYoung Roebourne Big hART participants Alison Lockyer, 16, Max Coppin, 16, and Nelson Coppin, 17, with WMYAC directors Allery Sandy and Michelle Adams announce extended funding for Big hART onstage at an event in Hobart. Credit: Big hART

A Roebourne-based Aboriginal corporation will extend its funding of social justice arts group Big hART into next year to allow the group to continue its “inspiring” work with local youth.

After stepping in to support the Ngurin Cultural Centre’s company in residence for 2018 when they were faced with a funding crisis at the start of this year, Wirlu-murra Yindjibarndi Aboriginal Corporation this month announced the group would extend that baseline funding into 2019.

WMYAC directors Michelle Adams and Allery Sandy said Big hART’s work in Roebourne in the last six years had been inspirational and empowering for local kids.

“Big hART’s work in the community is imperative, enabling our young people to step up and shine, grow skills and build strong futures,” Ms Adams said.

Big hART has been operating in Roebourne since 2011, when they were invited by a group of female elders to tell intergenerational stories of the community’s strength.

Since then it has worked with about 80 per cent of the town’s young people on a range of artistic projects.

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