Cross-cultural artwork to go on show at Karijini Experience

Shannon BeattiePilbara News
Red Air is a large scale artwork created by Maurice Goldberg and Matthew Aberline from Goldberg Aberline Studio along with Sharon and Kaye Warrie from Cheeditha Art Group.
Camera IconRed Air is a large scale artwork created by Maurice Goldberg and Matthew Aberline from Goldberg Aberline Studio along with Sharon and Kaye Warrie from Cheeditha Art Group. Credit: Goldberg Aberline Studio

An artwork that celebrates the melding of indigenous and contemporary culture will be displayed at the Karijini Experience.

Maurice Goldberg and Matthew Aberline from Goldberg Aberline Studio teamed up with Sharon and Kaye Warrie from Cheeditha Art Group to create the large-scale piece, titled Red Air.

The artwork premiered at Canberra’s Enlighten Festival in early March and will now return to the region that inspired it.

Aberline grew up in the Pilbara, living in Dampier with his family when he was a boy.

“When my family moved there it was a very optimistic time,” he said.

“We were absolutely dazzled by the landscape and by the water of the Dampier Archipelago, so this work is a remembering of that time, it’s quite nostalgic.”

Carrie McDowell from the Cheeditha Art Group set up Goldberg and Aberline with the Warrie sisters two years ago and the foursome have been collaborating on Red Air since.

“This work aims to create a bit of a bridge,” Aberline said.

“We asked ourselves how we create something that describes ancient Australia but also gives a vision for a new version of Australia, something that everyone can have access to.

“Typically, we use a lot of print in our work, we’re really well known for our fun and vibrant use of patterns.”

“In this work we tried to seamlessly merge our own part with the Aboriginal iconography to tell a story about an ancient Australia and a modern Australia at the same time.”

The massive-scale project is about 10m to 15m wide and 4m high and may turn up in a variety of locations in Karijini.

“Our works are large, we like fun and one of the things we love to play around with is a sense of scale,” Aberline said.

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